Text and photographs are © by Ellen Spector Platt & Ellen Zachos, all rights reserved.


Thursday, February 21, 2013

MANHATTAN ROSE


Walking on E. 81st after the last snow, I stop in my tracks. Can it be? There's a stick-like thing in the compacted soil of a treewell across from Antonucci's Cafe. A close look confirms my diagnosis.
There are the thorns, the greenish colored stems and the sharp cuts that indicate careful pruning. It's a rose bush, under a tree, roots weighted down by stone pavers. Ugh!

Pat Shanley, Founding President of the Manhattan Rose Society, and now V.P. of the American Rose Society goes around the country lecturing about rose growing. She says that her most frequently asked question is where on earth roses grow in Manhattan. I've lent her a few of my images for her talks. Now I have a new one for her.

I go inside Antonucci's and even though it's early, the lone guy setting up responds to my rap on the window. Yes, it's a pink rose that drew lots of attention last spring, planted by the landlord or the restaurant owner, he doesn't know which. I'll be checking out it's progress this year.
Other Places in Manhattan to See Roses
Climbing up a typical brownstone facade...
In a community garden in Chelsea...
 at the Central Park Zoo...
  in the Historic Rose District of Upper Manhattan, a Rosa 'Harison's Yellow'...
 on Park Avenue, with Will Ryman's sculptures in 2011...
up on The High Line, Rosa 'Mutabilis' blooming in summer, later with hips...
on Ann Kugel's 12th floor terrace...
Hanging in the basement of my building where the super Super allows me to dry perfectly in the heat...
and on the rooftop garden which I plant for my building, and where Annabelle and Lucy Platt thought the deliciously scented 'Graham Thomas'  rose was named for their Grammy...
and where 'All the Rage' blooms freely all summer.






8 comments:

BFF Nana said...

How delightful to see roses on this gray day. Thanks!

Ellen Zachos said...

I would have guessed that rose self-seeded, wedged as it is between the paving blocks. It must have been tiny when he planted it.

Ellen Spector Platt said...

I'm definitely going to do more research on this. I'm betting it's a grafted standard, therefor couldn't have self seeded.

Ellen Spector Platt said...

Betsy wrote:I loved today's post. I must learn how to grow better and more abundant roses.
It's time to get past the rose phobia thing!

Ellen Spector Platt said...

Betsy, I'm a no nonsense rose grower:I fertilize when I remember, never spray for pests and diseases; the plant shapes up or it's shovel pruned, i.e. dug out and discarded with no regrets. I now choose only those varieties sold as disease resistant and rely heavily on the rating of the American Rose Soc. Handbook. I'm also happy even if they don't have continuous bloom; most of the other shrubs in the garden bloom for a short period only and we still love our lilacs, forsythia, and azaleas.

interior designer california said...
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Linda Yang said...

THANX SOOOo very MUCH Ellen for your wonderful notes on the Brooklyn Chelsea Garden Center!!!! SO sorry I missed seeing you there...and glad you liked that Pieris! ~ Linda Yang

Annabelle P said...

Grammy you're in serious trouble for that picture that I just noticed.

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